Tag Archives: Burial chamber

Gallery Chat Special – A Walk Through King Tut’s Tomb With Howard Carter / Seis

” A Pale Green Mermaid Blog “

 

The burial chamber was surrounded by walls filled with images of egyptian life,

 The layout of the full tomb below courtesy of www.eyewitnesstohistory.com ,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howard Carter wrote,

‘It was, beyond any question, the sepulchral chamber in which we stood, for there, towering above us, was one of the great gilt shrines beneath which kings were laid. So enormous was this structure (17 feet by 11 feet, and 9 feet high, we found afterwards) that it filled within a little the entire area of the chamber, a space of some two feet only separating it from the walls on all four sides, while its roof, with cornice top and torus moulding, reached almost to the ceiling. From top to bottom it was overlaid with gold, and upon its sides there were inlaid panels of brilliant blue faience, in which were represented, repeated over and over, the magic symbols which would ensure its strength and safety. Around the shrine, resting upon the ground, there were a number of funerary emblems, and, at the north end, the seven magic oars the king would need to ferry himself across the waters of the underworld. The walls of the chamber, unlike those of the Antechamber, were decorated with brightly painted scenes and inscriptions, brilliant in their colours, but evidently somewhat hastily executed. “

  

Outside the tomb the press waited,

After opening the first sarcophagus the cleaning and cataloging began,

Inside the sarcophagus lay still more treasures and secrets…

 

To be continued…

 

Note:

www.globalegyptianmuseum.org   Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt 

www.britishmuseum.org  The British Museum, London, England 

www.metmuseum.org    The Metreopolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

IMAGES from Google

 

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Gallery Chat Special – A Walk Through King Tut’s Tomb With Howard Carter / Tres

” A Pale Green Mermaid Blog “

 

As he looked into the tomb, Howard Carter’s own words below,

With trembling hands I made a tiny breach in the upper left-hand corner. Darkness and blank space, as far as an iron testing-rod could reach, showed that whatever lay beyond was empty, and not filled like the passage we had just cleared. Candle tests were applied as a precaution against possible foul gases, and then, widening the hold a little, I inserted the candle and peered in, Lord Carnarvon, Lady Evelyn and Callender standing anxiously beside me to hear the verdict. At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the light, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold – everywhere the glint of gold. For the moment – an eternity it must have seemed to the others standing by – I was struck dumb with amazement, and when Lord Carnarvon, unable to stand the suspense any longer, inquired anxiously, “Can you see anything?” it was all I could do to get out the words, “Yes, wonderful things.”5

Lord Carnarvon was Howard Carter’s benefactor and funder of the expedition.

outside the tomb the excavation site looked ordinary,

 

Looking further into the tomb Howard Carter saw underneath a couch in the first room (antechamber) of the burial site…another sealed door…

To be continued…

Note:

Lord Carnarvon Lady Evelyn Carnarvon and Howard Carter-

A statue found in the antechamber,

All Images from Google

 

Note:

www.globalegyptianmuseum.org   Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt 

www.britishmuseum.org  The British Museum, London, England 

www.metmuseum.org    The Metreopolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

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Gallery Chat Special – A Walk Through King Tut’s Tomb With Howard Carter / Dos

” A Pale Green Mermaid Blog “

 

Here is the scene as it looked when Howard Carter entered the first chamber, 

another view of the cluttered and stacked treasures,

Disarray within the Tomb of Tutankhamun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another view,

 

 

 

To be continued…

Note:

Below text and image from Wikipedia,

Howard Carter (9 May 1874 – 2 March 1939) was an English archaeologist and Egyptologist, noted as a primary discoverer of the tomb of Tutankhamun.

In 1891, at the age of 17, Carter, a talented young artist, was sent out to Egypt by the Egypt Exploration Fund to assist Percy Newberry in the excavation and recording of Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hassan. Even at that young age he was innovative in improving the methods of copying tomb decoration. In 1892 he worked under the tutelage of William Matthew Flinders Petrie for one season at Amarna, the capital founded by the pharaoh Akhenaten. From 1894 to 1899 he then worked with Edouard Naville at Deir el Bahri where he recorded the wall reliefs in the temple of Hatshepsut, the first female Pharoah.

In 1899, Carter was appointed the first chief inspector of the Egyptian Antiquities Service (EAS). He supervised a number of excavations at Thebes (now known as Luxor) before he was transferred in 1904 to the Inspectorate of Lower Egypt. Carter resigned from the Antiquities Service in 1905 as a result of a dispute between Egyptian site guards and a group of French tourists.

Howard Carter

Howard Carter
Born 9 May 1874(1874-05-09)
Kensington, London
Died 2 March 1939 (aged 64)
Kensington, London
Nationality English
Fields Archaeologist and Egyptologist
Known for Discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun

 

Note:

www.globalegyptianmuseum.org   Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt 

www.britishmuseum.org  The British Museum, London, England 

www.metmuseum.org    The Metreopolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

IMAGE from Google

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Gallery Chat Special – A Walk Through King Tut’s Tomb With Howard Carter / Uno

” A Pale Green Mermaid Blog “

 

To celebrate the SNOW, PGM is presenting a series that will recreate Howard Carter’s walk through the first days of discovery and opening of King Tut’s tomb in Egypt…

it started with a seal –

 

 

This was all that lay between Tutankhamun’s treasures and the outside world.

The seal was stamped with the necropolis seal, consisting of a jackal over nine bound captives.  See detail below,

 The necropolis Seal with a Jackel (Anibus) at the top and nine, bound captives below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the seal was broken they entered the Tomb releasing air that was 3,000 years old.

 

 

 

To be continued…

 

Note:

www.globalegyptianmuseum.org   Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt 

www.britishmuseum.org  The British Museum, London, England 

www.metmuseum.org    The Metreopolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA

 

Images from Google

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Weekly Gallery Chat – “Canopic Jars From Egypt”

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Canopic jars were containers that held the remains of a person who was buried in the tombs of Egypt.  The jars themselves are considered pieces of sculpture the caps in particular represented  the deseased or later deities most popular at the time.

King Tut’s burial chamber held a wonderfully carved example made with alabaster which is a translucent stone.

 

Here is how the jars were found,

  

here is a closer detail,

Alabaster Canopic figure from the Tomb of Tutankhamun

 

you can see how the light shines through the stone giving the piece a life-like quality.

 

Hoping you a snow-less night.. I am sick of shoveling!!! 

Images above from google

Tutankhamun's Gold Inner Coffin
Tutankhamun’s Gold Inner Coffin   Image from www.touregypt.net

 

TEXT BELOW FROM WIKIPEDIA-

Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their own for the afterlife. They were commonly either carved from [lime] stone or were made of pottery.[1] These jars were used by Ancient Egyptians from the time of the Old Kingdom up until the time of the Late Period or the Ptolemaic Period, by which time the viscera were simply wrapped and placed with the body.[2] All the viscera were not kept in a single canopic jar, but rather each organ was placed in a jar of its own. The name ‘canopic’ reflects the mistaken association by early Egyptologists with the Greek legend of Canopus.[3][4]

The jars were four in number, each charged with the safekeeping of particular human organs: the stomach, intestines, lungs, and liver. The design of these changed over time. In the Old Kingdom the jars had plain lids, though by the First Intermediate Period jars with human heads (assumed to represent the dead) began to appear.[5]

This practice continued up until the time of the New Kingdom, though by the late Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt the human heads were replaced by heads associated with the four sons of Horus,[6] who were also the gods of the cardinal compass points.[7] Each god was responsible for protecting a particular organ, and wnet were themselves protected by companion goddesses from harm.

 

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